Impeachment Report Says Trump Solicited Foreign Election Interference


Cargando...

“Today, we may be witnessing a collision between the power of a remedy meant to curb presidential misconduct and the power of faction determined to defend against the use of that remedy on a president of the same party,” Mr. Schiff wrote. “But perhaps even more corrosive to our democratic system of governance, the president and his allies are making a comprehensive attack on the very idea of fact and truth.”

Still, he told reporters, Republicans’ dismissal of the case did not relieve Democrats of an obligation to press it forward. Indeed, House Democrats planned to huddle in the Capitol basement on Wednesday morning without aides to hear from Mr. Schiff and discuss next steps, according to Democratic officials.

The Judiciary Committee is scheduled to begin its debate on Wednesday with a public hearing that features four constitutional scholars discussing the historical standards for impeachment and their assessment about whether Mr. Trump’s actions meet the bar for removing him from office.

Lawyers for the Intelligence Committee are expected to formally present the report to the judiciary panel and answer questions from its members in the coming days, though no hearing has been scheduled.

Mr. Trump’s Republican allies on Capitol Hill released their own report on Monday, condemning the Democratic impeachment effort as illegitimate, and asserting that the president was not seeking personal political advantage when he pressed Ukraine’s leaders to investigate his rivals, but was instead urging the country to address corruption.

The Judiciary Committee will also consider potential evidence presented by other investigative committees and Robert S. Mueller III, the former special counsel, who documented Mr. Trump’s attempts to thwart his investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election.

In the Senate, where it is increasingly apparent to leaders of both parties that the chamber is going to conduct an impeachment trial, Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, made clear that he has been studying up on how to run one. He said he and Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader, could work out a bipartisan agreement governing procedures for a trial, or failing that, that “51 senators of any particular persuasion” could set the tone.



Source link Most Shared

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*