This doesn’t add up! Education bosses have failed to recruit enough new maths and science teachers


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This doesn’t add up! Education bosses have failed to recruit enough new maths and science teachers as it emerges secondary school targets have been missed for the SEVENTH year in a row

  • Department for Education fails to hire enough primary and secondary teachers
  • Just 43 per cent of the required new physics trainees have been recruited 
  • There are also not enough teachers for maths, languages and science subjects
  • But recruitment for biology teachers has exceeded its target at 166 per cent

The Government has failed to recruit enough new maths, science and languages teachers – after missing secondary school targets for the seventh year running.

The Department for Education figures, published yesterday, will renew fears about a shortage of qualified staff in key subjects across the country.

Teaching unions have warned of looming problems amid rising numbers of secondary school pupils.

The shortage of new maths recruits is particularly worrying amid a slump in take-up of the subject among pupils ¿ limiting the pool of potential future teachers. A-level maths entries fell from 97,628 last year to 91,895 this summer [File photo]

The shortage of new maths recruits is particularly worrying amid a slump in take-up of the subject among pupils – limiting the pool of potential future teachers. A-level maths entries fell from 97,628 last year to 91,895 this summer [File photo]

This year, just 43 per cent of the required new physics trainees have been recruited, along with 62 per cent in modern foreign languages.

Maths reached 64 per cent of its target – even worse than last year’s 70 per cent figure. Chemistry met 70 per cent of its target and computing, 79 per cent. 

But recruitment for biology exceeded its target at 166 per cent as did history (127 per cent), geography (119 per cent) and English (110 per cent).

Overall, the Department for Education reached 85 per cent of its own target for secondary subject trainees, with 17,098 new recruits instead of the 20,087 needed. 

Figures from the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) this week also revealed that the number of students enrolling on mathematical science degree courses has fallen to the lowest level since 2012 [File photo]

Figures from the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) this week also revealed that the number of students enrolling on mathematical science degree courses has fallen to the lowest level since 2012 [File photo]

It has continually failed to attract enough trainee teachers to this sector since 2013/14.

The target for new primary teachers was also missed – at 96 per cent. Some 12,482 trainees were hired instead of the 13,003 needed.

The DfE sets targets at primary and secondary level – and in each subject – based on numbers it estimates are needed to ensure there are enough qualified teachers in the future.

In total, there were 29,580 entrants to postgraduate initial teacher training (ITT) courses in the academic year 2019/20 – against 29,215 last year.

The shortage of new maths recruits is particularly worrying amid a slump in take-up of the subject among pupils – limiting the pool of potential future teachers. A-level maths entries fell from 97,628 last year to 91,895 this summer.

Figures from the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) this week also revealed that the number of students enrolling on mathematical science degree courses has fallen to the lowest level since 2012. 

Geoff Barton, of the Association of School and College Leaders, warned that the total number of trainees recruited this year ‘isn’t enough’ to meet rising numbers of secondary pupils.

This year, just 43 per cent of the required new physics trainees have been recruited, along with 62 per cent in modern foreign languages. Maths reached 64 per cent of its target ¿ even worse than last year¿s 70 per cent figure [File photo]

This year, just 43 per cent of the required new physics trainees have been recruited, along with 62 per cent in modern foreign languages. Maths reached 64 per cent of its target – even worse than last year’s 70 per cent figure [File photo]

He said: ‘The Department for Education has missed its targets for maths, modern foreign languages and physics by a country mile which is alarming as there are serious teacher shortages in all these subjects.’

Kevin Courtney, of the National Education Union, added: ‘The Government is still failing to account for historic under-recruitment, and is not doing enough to prevent so many teachers leaving.’

The Government has invested more than £250million in ‘financial incentives’ to encourage graduates to enter – and remain in – teaching.

Last month, ministers announced that aspiring maths, chemistry, physics and modern foreign language teachers will get up to £35,000 in bursary packages.

The Department for Education cannot comment due to a General Election ‘purdah’.



Source link World News

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